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Once a month we’ll send you a digest of our new blog posts – and once in a while we’ll send you a surprise.

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Subscribe to our newsletter.

Once a month we’ll send you a digest of our new blog posts – and once in a while we’ll send you a surprise.

DAAKE Receives National Recognition for Healthcare Website

Omaha’s award-winning comprehensive branding and design firm DAAKE earns eHealthcare Leadership Award for its client, Nebraska Medicine.

DAAKE shares a Silver award for Best Overall Internet Site – Healthcare System with technology partner agency, Centretek, for www.nebraskamed.com. This is Nebraska Medicine’s primary website, which was designed to improve usability across the site for patients, families, and providers.

The eHealthcare Leadership Awards is a leading awards program that recognizes the very best websites, digital communications, and business improvement initiatives of a wide range of healthcare organizations.   Entries in the 18th Annual eHealthcare Leadership Awards were judged based on a standard of internet/digital communications excellence and how they compared with others in their organization’s classification. This year, 116 individuals familiar with healthcare and the internet evaluated the entries. Winners were recognized on October 25, 2017 at the 21st Annual Healthcare Internet Conference in Austin, TX, and will be published in the December print edition of eHealthcare Strategy & Trends.

“Partnering with Nebraska Medicine and Centretek to create the new NebraskaMed.com was an incredible opportunity to help elevate the healthcare system’s brand,” says company principal, Greg Daake. “This award represents the collaboration and creativity that goes into building a website as comprehensive as Nebraska Medicine’s.”

 

Topics: News & Awards

Do You Trust Your Brand’s Positioning?

An hour ago you were at work. Then you got the call. There had been an accident. Your 7-year-old daughter was hurt when she fell down a flight of stairs at school. She was taken by ambulance to the hospital. Distraught and distracted, you are trying to process everything the doctor is telling you about the surgery that is about to take place. Has to take place. To help your daughter. Because she’s been hurt. Something about some stairs. And a concussion. And something, some bone, was broken.

“But she will be ok. . .”

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Topics: Our Thinking

Brand Resiliency Continually Tested

Brands can be characterized for their longevity, creativity, familiarity and sustainability. But, what about a brand’s resiliency? Its “survivability?”

On November 21, 1980, a fire swept from a restaurant under construction through the casino area of the MGM Grand hotel in Las Vegas. Eighty-five people died and more than 700 were injured. It took some time, but the MGM rebounded after the fire. It did not go out of business; it built upon the reputation of its brand and showed its resiliency in the wake of tragedy. Today, the MGM is a gleaming showpiece of the Las Vegas strip, home to gamblers and concert-goers and some of the biggest boxing matches on the planet.

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Topics: Our Thinking

Who Cares About Brand Apathy?

Two dozen clinics in your city, each one named some version of the phrase, “Urgent Care.” Pick one; any one. It doesn’t matter, right? They all seem the same.

Seeming isn’t being.

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Topics: Our Thinking

Brands Have Needs, Too

From the time we could speak complete sentences, we have said it many times. “I need that.” From the coolest new car to the latest version of iPhone, we’ve all turned toddler and proclaimed our most pressing “need.” If only we remembered the lesson our parents tried to instill – the difference between a “need” and a “want.” Because, as they said over and over as they pushed, pulled and prodded us down endless store aisles, we wanted a lot of things we didn’t really need.

Brands have wants. They want to be distinctive. They want to be remembered. They want to be respected and popular. To be any and especially to be all of those, brands need to work hard. They need to be supported. They need constant refinement and updating. They need attention.

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Topics: Our Thinking